Some Stars Wobble

Some Stars Wobble opens 6pm Friday 2 June at Sawtooth ARI in Launceston, Tasmania.

Here on the Earth we are never still. Imagine drawing a line in space that traces your location as you go round and round, as the globe spins on its axis, as the Earth orbits the sun, as the solar system revolves, slowly, around the centre of the galaxy. The hanging mobiles, installations and paintings exhibited in Some Stars Wobble examine the complex balance of a shared existence in the universe.

There are also three other exciting exhibitions opening at Sawtooth ARI on 2 June, check their website for full details.

Opening 6pm Friday 2 June
Exhibition runs 1 June – 24 June

Sawtooth ARI
Level , 160 Cimitiere St
Launceston Tasmania

Gallery Hours 
Wednesday to Friday 12 noon – 5 pm
Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

Stargazers

Star Gazing

Claire Pendrigh, Stargazing (Perseid Meteor Shower), 2016, still from digital animation

We are all made from star stuff, so is it really that surprising that so many of us look to the night sky and feel some kind of connection?

Everyone has access to the night sky, it can not be owned, annexed or restricted to a select few. Anyone can be a stargazer.

The points of light we see in the night sky are the centre of a great many stories; stories of culture, navigation, exploration, science, history and understanding. They have been used to pass on legends, moral tales, cultural histories, navigational routes, and scientific theories. They are bestowed with personal significance for individuals and groups of people.

Gazing into the cosmos reminds us that our existence is small. We share this tiny planet, surrounded by the infinite expanse of our universe. But our stories are important. They locate us within this expanse, and present a framework by which we can analyse and understand this position.

Stargazers is a project in which I hope to collect many stories about stars, and use them to create short animated works. These stories may encompass a wide variety of contexts including scientific, cultural, navigational, personal, anecdotal and historical, but they will all pertain to a specific point of light (or constellation) in the night sky. Ultimately, the stories will be linked together by a navigable sky map.

I am currently on the look out for stories and narrators! If you would like to get involved then please contact me. I am interested to hear all types of stories about stars, astronomical bodies, constellations etc. If your story is a good fit for the project then I will ask you to narrate it for me and email me the audio. I will then make a painting and an animation for your story.

Star Stuff

Claire Pendrigh, Star Stuff (Omega Nebula), 2016, still from digital animation

In Berlin

Studio

Welcome to my new studio space in Berlin at Studios ID!

Constructed in 1985, the Studios ID building is located within the former Operative Technical Sector, originally operated by the Ministry of State Security. This building was the Intelligence Department offices, and used to be responsible for the development, production and maintenance of all espionage equipment, including wiretapping devices, cameras, camouflage and monitoring instruments. Now it is home to around 200 artist studios like mine.

I will be working here for March and April 2016.

Knitglitch Blanket

Blanket

Knitglitch’s blanket is on exhibition at Bunbury Regional Art Galleries for the holidays! Visit it in the Archive Room installation space upstairs.

This artwork was created as part of the Awesome Arts Creative Challenge 2015; a program where artists are placed in schools in remote and regional Western Australia. Knitglitch (Claire Pendrigh and Dan Macnish) worked with students in years 1 – 6 in Bunbury’s Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School for one week.

Blanket is a soft, interactive interpretation of the environment of Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School. It is a collaborative artwork made by all the students (totaling about 70) who were involved in the Creative Challenge 2015.

A series of soft sensors made from wool and conductive thread play sounds created by the students when pressed. Explore the Blanket to experience Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School through the eyes and ears of its young artists!

Read more about the project at knitglitch.wordpress.com.

Christmas Shop

vessles1

Vessels, a series of small ceramic bowls, is currently at Bunbury Regional Art Galleries as part of the Christmas Shop exhibition. These works were created as part of my recent body of work Tea Seas, responding to time spent in Japan on a two month artist residency.

In this exhibition, the Vessles can be purchased individually at $20 each.

vessles3

vessles2

The Creative Challenge

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This September Knit Glitch (myself and fellow artist, Daniel Macnish) took part in the Awesome Arts Creative Challenge.

The Creative Challenge is a residency program that sends artists to schools in remote and regional Western Australia to work with the students and create something awesome! The aim of the Creative Challenge is to celebrate the talents, perceptions and stories of young people in regional and remote Western Australia and to instil a sense of pride, ownership and place within the communities.

Knit Glitch was placed at Djidi Djidi Aboriginal School in Bunbury, and it was such a pleasure to work with the bright young artists there. For one week, we spent each day working with students in years 1 to 6, felting an interactive blanket. The finished blanket contains soft sensors that, when pressed, play sounds recorded by the students.

The artwork will be on display in the Perth Cultural Centre for the Creative Challenge Exhibition at the AWESOME Festival from 3 – 6 October 2015.

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Tea Seas at BRAG

exhibition opening 4

Tea Seas, a body of work created during my recent artist residency at Studio Kura in Itoshima, Japan, is now on display at Bunbury Regional Art Galleries (BRAG). It is wonderfully refreshing to be able to exhibit in the same town that I live in for the first time in a long while!

I would like to send a huge thanks to all the staff at BRAG for their involvement, and to Sharon Kennedy for opening the exhibition.

Tea Seas uses imagery of a primordial sea contained in a teacup. Taking their cues from the Japanese tea ceremony, these artworks follow a ritualistic process of repetition and restraint. The paintings, drawings and animation work exhibited use traditional Japanese pigments on rice paper to explore our own biology and evolution.

Photographs by Taj Kemp.

exhibition opening